Search Results for 'nanowrimo'

NaNoWriMo Check-In 

Filed in Ask the Editor, Writing Tips by on November 24, 2020 0 Comments
NaNoWriMo Check-In 

If you’ve been participating in NaNoWriMo this year, my guess is you’re acutely aware that there is less than a week left to accomplish the challenge of writing 50,000 words in the month of November. Don’t start to sweat at that thought. Here’s how to keep moving forward, no matter which stage you’re at in […]

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Stay On Track During NaNoWriMo 

Filed in Writing Tips by on November 12, 2020 0 Comments
Stay On Track During NaNoWriMo 

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is an annual event in which participants commit to writing a 50,000-word novel during the month of November. It began in 1999 as a challenge between friends, but it’s since grown into a global writing challenge with hundreds of thousands of participants each year. We’ve compiled some tips on how […]

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10 Ways to Prepare for NaNoWriMo

Filed in Writing Tips by on October 13, 2020 0 Comments
10 Ways to Prepare for NaNoWriMo

We’re a few weeks out from the biggest novel writing challenge of the year: National Novel Writing Month! Every November, writers from around the world dedicate themselves to cranking out a 50,000-word first draft manuscript in 30 days. Tons of writers have gone on to publish their books after the challenge, and thousands have credited […]

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Happy NaNoWriMo!

Filed in From the Desk of... by on November 5, 2019 0 Comments
Happy NaNoWriMo!

November is a busy month for writers: it’s National Novel Writing Month, also known as NaNoWriMo. What happens during NaNoWriMo? It’s simple really. To celebrate the only official book-writing month of the year, writers are encouraged to spend 30 days putting their fingers to the keyboard, completing a 50,000-word book by November 30th. One month. Boom. […]

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When to Use a Scene Break

Filed in Ask the Editor, Writing Tips by on November 10, 2020 0 Comments
When to Use a Scene Break

Did you know the symbol—most commonly three asterisks—inserted between sections of text to break the scene is called a dinkus? Scene breaks serve many purposes, but one reason it’s used is to give readers a breather. Imagine reading an intense scene that holds a lot of significance, but the chapter doesn’t end when the scene […]

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