Tag: NanoWriMo

Gearing Up for NaNoWriMo

Filed in Author Inspirations by on October 26, 2021 0 Comments
Gearing Up for NaNoWriMo

For writers, there is one important festivity that takes place right before the holidays. The writing event of the year — NaNoWriMo — starts November 1, and we want to make sure you’re as prepared as possible if you’re planning on participating in the 30-day sprint to a 50,000-word first draft of your next novel. […]

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Post-Writing Blues

Filed in Author Inspirations by on December 8, 2020 0 Comments
Post-Writing Blues

Disclosure If you or any other person have concerns about depression you should consult with your health care provider immediately. The opinions and views expressed on this blog and website have no relation to those of any academic, hospital, health practice, or other governing institution.   What Is Post-Writing Blues? You did it! You finished writing […]

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NaNoWriMo Check-In 

Filed in Ask the Editor, Writing Tips by on November 24, 2020 0 Comments
NaNoWriMo Check-In 

If you’ve been participating in NaNoWriMo this year, my guess is you’re acutely aware that there is less than a week left to accomplish the challenge of writing 50,000 words in the month of November. Don’t start to sweat at that thought. Here’s how to keep moving forward, no matter which stage you’re at in […]

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Stay On Track During NaNoWriMo 

Filed in Writing Tips by on November 12, 2020 0 Comments
Stay On Track During NaNoWriMo 

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is an annual event in which participants commit to writing a 50,000-word novel during the month of November. It began in 1999 as a challenge between friends, but it’s since grown into a global writing challenge with hundreds of thousands of participants each year. We’ve compiled some tips on how […]

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When to Use a Scene Break

Filed in Ask the Editor, Writing Tips by on November 10, 2020 0 Comments
When to Use a Scene Break

Did you know the symbol—most commonly three asterisks—inserted between sections of text to break the scene is called a dinkus? Scene breaks serve many purposes, but one reason it’s used is to give readers a breather. Imagine reading an intense scene that holds a lot of significance, but the chapter doesn’t end when the scene […]

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